News

The Children’s Museum of Cleveland Aims to Provide World-Class Developmental Experiences for Kids
Callahan Foundation grant recipient The Children’s Museum of Cleveland uses the value of play to shape a new generation of emotionally healthy children who love to learn. The Children’s Museum of Cleveland is a one-of-a-kind resource in Northeast Ohio: it’s the only museum dedicated to early childhood learning. The museum uses the value of play to shape children by fostering learning and development through experiences, exhibits, and educational programming, within and outside the museum. “We are able to reach families in a unique way in that we provide a chance for them to share and learn through play,” describes CMC Executive Director Maria Campanelli. “Families come to the museum looking for fun and adventure; the learning is often a welcome byproduct but one that we seek to encourage at every turn.” Now, the museum is creating a new model for the community’s children through the purchase and renovation of a new home, the former Stager-Beckwith Mansion along Cleveland’s historic Millionaire’s Row. The mansion will be transformed into a world-class children’s museum, with double the exhibit space of the former facility as well as outdoor green space. The CMC has designed exhibits by studying the success of other children’s museums, researching theories of play and child development, examining contemporary play trends, understanding Ohio learning standards, and incorporating feedback from former visitors and community stakeholders. The Callahan Foundation is proud to support the expansion of the CMC with a $25,000 grant over the course of two years to support the renovation of the museum’s new home and exhibit development. “These exhibits include Adventure City, which features a giant climber and gross motor creative play space, Wonder Lab, with water and air play that supports STEM learning, and more,” explains Karen Katz, Director of Exhibits. Allen describes the experiences that result from the museum’s programming efforts as […]
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FIRST Robotics Inspires Science, Tech And Engineering Leaders In Buckeye Regional Competition
Callahan Foundation grant recipient FIRST® Robotics challenges students to be robot inventors in the Buckeye Regional Competition this month. Over 1,500 high school students from throughout Ohio and neighboring states will compete later this month in the FIRST® Robotics Buckeye Regional Competition. The young inventors have been tasked with creating steam-powered robotic airships, and will present their creations March 30-April 1 at Cleveland State University. Working in teams, the students spent six weeks designing, building and programming the robots as part of FIRST’s annual, competitive-based education program. Students coupled creativity with skills like math, science, engineering, business and project management, art, video and industrial sciences in the competition. FIRST inspires innovation in students and fosters well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership. The impact of participation in the competition for students extends beyond the event, from the growth of science, technology and engineering skills, through to careers in STEM. The Buckeye Regional is considered among the best regional competitions nationally for the quality of experience provided to the high school students participating. The Callahan Foundation is proud to be a sponsor of the competition, awarding the FIRST Robotics Buckeye Regional $10,000 to support the cost of the presentation of the annual event. The event is open to the public and will be held at Cleveland State University’s Wolstein Center. To learn more about the event, visit FIRST Buckeye Regional Competition.
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Spring Grant Submission Cycle Opens: 4 Tips to Improve Your Concept Paper
As the Callahan Foundation’s spring grant cycle opens for concept paper submissions, keep these four basics in mind when crafting your application.  The Callahan Foundation is now accepting concept paper submissions for the 2017 spring grant cycle. Northeast Ohio nonprofit organizations with a focus on higher education, the arts and social services are encouraged to apply. Funding is offered to eligible nonprofits that demonstrate superior leadership and create value for those in need. As you craft your concept paper, remember to review the full requirements, and consider these four tips for a successful application: Clearly state the focus. Your concept paper is the initial gatekeeper and key to the grant application process. Write with clarity: make sure the message and intent is highly focused and the language is straightforward. Elaborate on the community you serve. Who does your organization serve, and how? Describe the population and how they benefit from your nonprofit’s services in detail. Conveying a thorough understanding of how your organization impacts communities enhances your application. Define the link. How does your organization or program fit the criteria required? Discuss how and why your nonprofit aligns with the ethos of the Callahan Foundation. Don’t forget the details. Make sure that you carefully read the application requirements. Adhere to the correct file formatting and content requirements laid out in the grant application guidelines. Remember to include contact information and a business mailing address! Deadline for initial concept paper submission is March 31,, 2017, after which a select number of concept papers will be invited via email to submit full proposals. Successful applicants will be notified of funding June 30, 2017. Submissions for initial concept papers can be uploaded here.
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Legal Aid Society of Cleveland Advocates for Education
Callahan Foundation award recipient Legal Aid Society of Cleveland removes barriers to education for vulnerable and low-income families. When looking at the root causes of poverty, lack of education is both a cause and an effect. A direct correlation exists showing the longer a child spends in school, the less likely they are to be poor – and it’s the reason why legal advocacy ensuring children have access to good education is so important. “Federal law actually requires that all children get a free, public education,” says Melanie Shakarian, Esq., director of development and communications at the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland. The civil, nonprofit law firm provides advocacy for vulnerable and low-income families, and their children who may not be receiving the appropriate public education required under federal law. The organization, established in 1905 and with 134 branches across the US, operates one of its largest branches in Cleveland. Awarded $20,000 in Callahan Foundation’s 2016 Spring Funding Cycle, the Legal Aid Society’s “Access to Education” program has helped remove barriers to education for children through direct representation, community education and advocacy. In the past decade, education law has become a focused element of their practice, with two and a half full-time attorneys dedicated to the project. “These are people who handle representing young children in school who are being denied services at their school,” says Shakarian. “It could be a child who has a disability who’s not provided an accommodation, maybe because they have a physical disability or mental health concern and they need an accommodation at their school. We could be representing a child who has been bullied and needs to be removed from their particular classroom or school because of the abuse they’re receiving. We’ll represent that child to make sure they get the services they’re entitled […]
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Callahan Foundation in the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Magazine
Read an article on the Callahan Foundation in the Cleveland Clinic Foundation magazine (pdf download).
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